April 17th, 2010

E(Patients)-I(Pad)-O(pportunities):Medlibs Round

A toy farmer stands in front of his toy cow and pig

EIEIO by Andrew Kantor

Welcome to a rather delayed Medlibs Round here at eagledawg.net, a new location since I hosted last year about PubMed. Without further ado, we’ll cover one broad and two specific subjects (ePatients and iPads) for this edition.

ePatients

During March the Social Health 2010 Unconference was held and Luke Roseburg’s presentation there and coverage about Librarians and ePatients as Partners is a must read for all librarians (not just medical) to better understand participatory medicine. I opine whether current information resources are sufficient to satisfy ePatient information needs  in One and the same?  Consumer health, E-patients, Patient education

In April, The ePatient: Digital and Genomic Technologies for Personalized Health Care was the subject of the Friends of the National Library of Medicine (FNLM) annual meeting. This meeting was covered on Twitter with the hashtag #eNLM at about the same time NLM launched a social media page that I covered, and I’m hopeful the meeting was recorded and those videos will be made available soon. The meeting was mentioned in Federal Computer Week, but I’m struggling to find comprehensive coverage beyond Day 1 and Day 2 Twitter transcripts. If you know of coverage sources I’m missing, please do share and I’ll add them as edits here! EDIT: NLM has posted pictures of #eNLM on their Facebook page!

With the increasing use of electronic medical records, radiologists in particular were concerned about the possibility of too much information leading to patient anxiety, as an April article in the Journal of the American College of Radiology reported. What about ePatient and clinician interaction online? Some real life examples are illustrated at Risks and Benefits for Physicians Who Use Social Media/Web 2.0 by Clinical Cases and Images: CasesBlog.

iPad

April has also brought the much-hyped launch of Apple’s iPad, with pre-launch coverage of medical field possibilities by Alison Aldrich at the Dragonfly iPad: What’s the Potential for Clinicians and Researchers? Don’t miss Daniel Hooker’s post-launch collection of  iPad information for librarians at iPad link roundup: what you want, when you want it at the socialibrarian.

An insightful post-launch review by Dr. Larry Nathanson as a guest post at Life as a Healthcare CIO covers his use of an iPad in the ER, one of the most challenging and punishing environments possible for electronics & the sleekness of design does not escape notice for falls potential. Another review emphasizing the speed of data-rich medical apps loading on iPads for healthcare and that “EMR vendors and medical app developers should have no problem making complex, feature rich software.” featured on iPad review for doctors at KevinMD. If you’ll be in Washington DC next month, do not miss Dr. Halamka’s Knowledge Services and the Role of Medical Libraries in Healthcare IT Leiter Lecture at the Medical Library Association meeting. I’ll be attending and blogging about it for certain.

Another post-release take on the iPad is from TechCrunch with The iPad is a Kindle Killer, I Just Wish it Weren’t Going to Kill Reading Too highlighting the fact that it’s pretty easy to be distracted by other things while reading, and includes the first mention of the past tense verb ‘atted’ I’ve seen in reference to watching for people mentioning you by username on Twitter. There is a reported iPad bug that is affecting the campus network at Princeton, where they will block your malfunctioning iPad to maintain system stability if needed.

Opportunities

Walter Jessen contributed Where You Live Matters to Your Health posted at Highlight HEALTH, offering an introduction to the recently released countyhealthrankings.org which is a great source of data to better understand health issues and disparities. Medlibs Round creator Jacqueline offers two insightful entries about data visualization in Information is Beautiful. Visualizing the Evidence for Health Supplements and An Evidence Pyramid that Facilitates the Finding of Evidence at Laika’s MedLibLog.

Dr. Ves Dimov contributed Internet-based Approaches to Enhance Education of Allergy and Immunology Fellows: Practical Examples at Allergy Notes, and Dr Shock offered The Web Behaviour Test at Dr Shock MD PhD with an annotation of I did the web behaviour test on BBC Lab UK, you’ll have to register. The test took 20 minutes and wasn’t easy, but enjoyed it. Lab UK is a BBC website where you can participate in groundbreaking scientific experiments online for a bit of fun.

These are only a few of the current emerging audiences and information resources highlighting health information needs. Thank you for joining me this month! May’s host of the Medlibs Round is (the) health informaticist who is sure to bring more sources along these lines, so be sure to get your contributions in and happy blogging!

Posted at 09 37 PM | 4 Comments » | print this post

4 Responses to “E(Patients)-I(Pad)-O(pportunities):Medlibs Round”

  1. RachelW says:

    Nice one, Nikki!

  2. Social comments and analytics for this post…

    This post was mentioned on Twitter by aleksb6: good overview of #ipad can be useful for extending #EMR functionality: http://bit.ly/b2L9Sf

  3. […] Saturday of every month   You can see the March edition here with the April edition here covering e-patients, iPad and […]

  4. Bruce says:

    EIEIO by Andrew Kantor
    Welcome to a rather delayed Medlibs Round here at eagledawg.net, a new location since I hosted last year about PubMed. Without further ado, we’ll cover one broad and two specific subjects (ePatients and iPads) for this edition.
    ePatients
    During March the Social Health 2010 Unconference was held and Luke Roseburg’s presentation there and […]

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